So, what’s your story?

Our stories make us. We draw upon and imbibe from stories around us or that which we are exposed to. Some of us actively expose ourselves to stories – those of us who know the value of will. We become the stories through gradual imbibation. We tell the dialogues (in our minds or through our mouths) from scripts taken from other stories (stories of other people, dialogues we are subjected to through everyday conversations with other people, stories from books, movies, lyrics, fairy tales, folklore, history) and the material colluded through mix n’ match to make our own narratives. Those of us who have deliberated on creating our own stories deliberate on eliminating plagiarism (by paying close attention to the stories that run through our minds and is uttered through our mouths) until the stories imbibed are distilled and the essence therefrom becomes part of the stories that we are. The fabric of the person keeps changing all through the process (our photographs from young childhood to adulthood is evidence of our material changing through development of our stories). Some of us deliberate on distilling our stories until there is just one story and the person becomes one story – embodied. We are all bits of information. What story are you?

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Transliteration..between disciplines(duh..what?!)

I know transliteration means converting text from one script to another, but for want of a better word (and if you look closer, the logic is not too different), transliteration as a word will do, I think, to make my point.

Check out this example.

“Sorrow prepares you for joy. It violently sweeps everything out of your house, so that new joy can find space to enter. It shakes the yellow leaves from the bough of your heart, so that fresh, green leaves can grow in their place. It pulls up the rotten roots, so that new roots hidden beneath have room to grow. Whatever sorrow shakes from your heart, far better things will take their place. ~ Rumi”

If you replace the word sorrow with ‘pain’ and joy with ‘growth,’ it would read ‘Pain prepares you for growth. It violently sweeps everything out of your house, so that new growth can find space to enter. It shakes the yellow leaves from the bough of your heart, so that fresh, green leaves can grow in their place. It pulls up the rotten roots, so that new roots hidden beneath have room to grow. Whatever pain shakes from your heart, far better things will take their place.”

My point? Change a few words here and there and the same message gets shifted from an emotional discipline to a somatic discipline. Both disciplines would have their own reasons for why their respective message is correct. Change the intensity of the words within their respective disciplines and see how the argument gets more intense. If one side has a more intense word than the other, the supporting context-based argument gets stronger and then one side gets more correct than the other! Try transliteration between science and religion as 2 disciplines. Use words like ‘science’ itself for science as a discipline and ‘God’ for religion in the above sentence. Oh! and change the words ‘your heart’ to something more factual (like, a tree) for science and retain it as ‘your heart’ for religion, and then see how the argument sits.

Try different contexts, instead of the same above-mentioned sentence. How about quantum physics for science and omnipresence/omnipotence for religion? (!) Can you see anything common between the 2 phrases of the 2 disciplines? Transliteration possible? Have fun! (says she with an impish grin).

 

Published in: on December 3, 2015 at 3:21 pm  Leave a Comment  
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